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MeetOur Physicians

  • Asad K. Mohmand
    M.D.


  • Michael A. Graceffo
    M.D.

    Dr. Graceffo specializes in Interventional Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease.

  • Deepak H. Patel
    M.D.

    Dr. Patel specializes in Cardiovascular Disease and Nuclear Cardiology.

  • Matt D. Fay
    M.D.


  • L. Keith Routh
    M.D.

    Dr. Routh specializes in Interventional Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease.

Welcome to HeartPlace

Mission Statement:

HeartPlace is the past, present, and future of cardiology in North Texas. Founded almost 50 years ago, HeartPlace is the oldest and largest cardiovascular group in North Texas. From its small beginning in Dallas, HeartPlace has grown to over 70 physicians throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. HeartPlace has been an innovator in cardiovascular services, introducing to the North Texas area procedures such as coronary angiography, angioplasty, coronary stenting, and electrophysiology. This dedication to innovative techniques and procedures has guaranteed our patients the latest and most up-to-date cardiovascular services...

Heart Healthy Tips & News

  • Mentally stressed young women with heart disease more likely to have reduced blood flow to heart

    Young women with stable coronary heart disease are more likely than men to have reduced blood flow to the heart if they're under emotional stress, but not physical stress, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. Compared to men of the same age, when subjected to a mental stress test, women: age 55 and younger had three times greater reduction in blood flow to the heart; age 56-64 had double the reduction in blood flow to the heart; and age 65 and older had no difference in blood flow to the heart. "Women who develop heart disease at a younger age make up a special high-risk group because they are disproportionally vulnerable to emotional stress," said Viola Vaccarino, M.D., Ph.D., study author and chairwoman of Cardiovascular Research and Epidemiology at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, Georgia. Source: Medical News Today Read More Read More

  • Active asthma may significantly raise risk of heart attack

    Recent asthma symptoms or asthma that requires daily medication may significantly raise the risk of heart attack, according to two research papers presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. "Physicians should do all they can to control every other modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in patients with asthma," said Matthew C. Tattersall, D.O., M.S., study author and an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Source: Medical News Today Read More Read More

  • AHA: Yogurt Consumption Linked to Reduced Risk of High BP

    For women, regular yogurt consumption is associated with reduced risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association`s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2016 Scientific Sessions, held from March 1 to 4 in Phoenix.

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  • A clinical score for predicting risk of venous thromboembolism

    A new clinical prediction model can help identify high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among patients with a leg cast, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine. The study was conducted by Banne Nemeth of Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, and colleagues and utilized data from three large cohorts to develop and validate two prediction models and a risk score, the L-TRiP(cast) score, to help doctors deciding whether to prescribe anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis. Source: Medical News Today Read More Read More

  • Visualising calcified coronary arteries may be wake-up call to change lifestyle

    Looking at images of their own calcified coronary arteries may be a wake-up call for patients with newly diagnosed coronary artery disease to change their lifestyles, reveals new research. The study was presented today at EuroHeartCare 2015 by Rikke Elmose Mols, a nurse and PhD student in the Department of Cardiology at Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby in Denmark. Source: Medical News Today Read More Read More

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