Archive for the ‘Healthcare News’ Category:

Breakthrough: Statin treatment reduces risk of cardiovascular disease in women

A large international study has shown conclusively that statin treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The research confirms that statins are beneficial not only to women who have already had a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke, but also in those who - whilst they have not yet developed cardiovascular disease -- are at an increased risk of such diseases. Source: Science Daily Read More

Significant link between daily physical activity, vascular health

As millions of Americans resolve to live healthier lives in 2015, research shows just how important diligent daily physical activity is. The researchers found that reducing daily physical activity for even a few days leads to decreases in the function of the inner lining of blood vessels in the legs of young, healthy subjects causing vascular dysfunction that can have prolonged effects. Source: Science Daily Read More

Prostate cancer medications linked with increased risk of heart-related deaths in men with cardiovascular problems

A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Source: Science Daily Read More

Shutting off blood supply to extremity to protect heart

Shutting off the blood supply to an arm or leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation, a study shows. "The heart muscle of the patients who had restricted blood flow to their arm before surgery were able to maintain the same level of energy production during the whole operation, while heart muscle from the other patients' hearts was not. This may be important because heart tissue is dependent on energy to survive, as well as to repair injuries the cells may have endured during surgery," an investigator says. Source: Science Daily Read More

Active asthma may significantly raise risk of heart attack

Recent asthma symptoms or asthma that requires daily medication may significantly raise the risk of heart attack, according to two research papers presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. "Physicians should do all they can to control every other modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in patients with asthma," said Matthew C. Tattersall, D.O., M.S., study author and an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Source: Medical News Today Read More

Mentally stressed young women with heart disease more likely to have reduced blood flow to heart

Young women with stable coronary heart disease are more likely than men to have reduced blood flow to the heart if they're under emotional stress, but not physical stress, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. Compared to men of the same age, when subjected to a mental stress test, women: age 55 and younger had three times greater reduction in blood flow to the heart; age 56-64 had double the reduction in blood flow to the heart; and age 65 and older had no difference in blood flow to the heart. "Women who develop heart disease at a younger age make up a special high-risk group because they are disproportionally vulnerable to emotional stress," said Viola Vaccarino, M.D., Ph.D., study author and chairwoman of Cardiovascular Research and Epidemiology at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, Georgia. Source: Medical News Today Read More

New online calculator estimates cardiovascular disease risk

The new Healthy Heart Score developed by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) gives individuals an easy method to estimate their 20-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) based on simple lifestyle habits. The free web-based survey, which will be found at www.healthyheartscore.com, also gives users practical tips for improving their scores by incorporating heart-healthy habits into their daily lives. "Currently recommended risk models for CVD are harder for an individual to calculate on their own because they include clinical risk factors such as elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. These risk scores, which are mostly used in doctors' offices, often underestimate the burden of CVD among middle-aged adults, and women in particular," said Stephanie Chiuve, a research associate in the Department of Nutrition at HSPH and assistant professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. "The Healthy Heart Score is all about modifiable lifestyle risks, which may increase awareness of CVD prevention through lifestyle interventions earlier in life, prior to the development of clinical risk factors." Source: Medical News Today Read More

CABG superior to PCI for treating diabetics with heart disease

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) proves superior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for treating multivessel or left main coronary artery disease in diabetic patients, according to a study being published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Diabetes affects up to 400 million persons worldwide, with that number expected to increase significantly over the next two decades. Because patients with diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease, the optimal revascularization technique for these patients is an important unsolved question. Source: Medical News Today Read More

Abdominal Fat Most Strongly Linked to Hypertension Risk

The association between obesity and the development of hypertension appears to be driven specifically by visceral adiposity, according to research published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Alvin Chandra, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues followed 903 normotensive participants of the Dallas Heart Study (median age, 40 years; 57 percent women; 60 percent nonwhite; median body mass index, 27.5 kg/m²) for a median of seven years to monitor the development of hypertension. Imaging studies were used to assess adiposity, including visceral adiposity. Source: Physician's Briefing Read More

More Leisure Physical Activity Tied to Lower Heart Failure Risk

Higher leisure time physical activity is associated with a lower risk of developing heart failure, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Circulation: Heart Failure. Kasper Andersen, M.D., Ph.D., from Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues evaluated responses to a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history for 39,805 individuals without baseline heart failure in 1997. They assessed the total and direct effects of self-reported total and leisure-time physical activity on the risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of non-ischemic origin. Read More
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