Archive for the ‘Healthcare News’ Category:

Active asthma may significantly raise risk of heart attack

Recent asthma symptoms or asthma that requires daily medication may significantly raise the risk of heart attack, according to two research papers presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. "Physicians should do all they can to control every other modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in patients with asthma," said Matthew C. Tattersall, D.O., M.S., study author and an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Source: Medical News Today Read More

Mentally stressed young women with heart disease more likely to have reduced blood flow to heart

Young women with stable coronary heart disease are more likely than men to have reduced blood flow to the heart if they're under emotional stress, but not physical stress, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. Compared to men of the same age, when subjected to a mental stress test, women: age 55 and younger had three times greater reduction in blood flow to the heart; age 56-64 had double the reduction in blood flow to the heart; and age 65 and older had no difference in blood flow to the heart. "Women who develop heart disease at a younger age make up a special high-risk group because they are disproportionally vulnerable to emotional stress," said Viola Vaccarino, M.D., Ph.D., study author and chairwoman of Cardiovascular Research and Epidemiology at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, Georgia. Source: Medical News Today Read More

New online calculator estimates cardiovascular disease risk

The new Healthy Heart Score developed by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) gives individuals an easy method to estimate their 20-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) based on simple lifestyle habits. The free web-based survey, which will be found at www.healthyheartscore.com, also gives users practical tips for improving their scores by incorporating heart-healthy habits into their daily lives. "Currently recommended risk models for CVD are harder for an individual to calculate on their own because they include clinical risk factors such as elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. These risk scores, which are mostly used in doctors' offices, often underestimate the burden of CVD among middle-aged adults, and women in particular," said Stephanie Chiuve, a research associate in the Department of Nutrition at HSPH and assistant professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. "The Healthy Heart Score is all about modifiable lifestyle risks, which may increase awareness of CVD prevention through lifestyle interventions earlier in life, prior to the development of clinical risk factors." Source: Medical News Today Read More

CABG superior to PCI for treating diabetics with heart disease

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) proves superior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for treating multivessel or left main coronary artery disease in diabetic patients, according to a study being published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Diabetes affects up to 400 million persons worldwide, with that number expected to increase significantly over the next two decades. Because patients with diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease, the optimal revascularization technique for these patients is an important unsolved question. Source: Medical News Today Read More

Abdominal Fat Most Strongly Linked to Hypertension Risk

The association between obesity and the development of hypertension appears to be driven specifically by visceral adiposity, according to research published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Alvin Chandra, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues followed 903 normotensive participants of the Dallas Heart Study (median age, 40 years; 57 percent women; 60 percent nonwhite; median body mass index, 27.5 kg/m²) for a median of seven years to monitor the development of hypertension. Imaging studies were used to assess adiposity, including visceral adiposity. Source: Physician's Briefing Read More

More Leisure Physical Activity Tied to Lower Heart Failure Risk

Higher leisure time physical activity is associated with a lower risk of developing heart failure, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Circulation: Heart Failure. Kasper Andersen, M.D., Ph.D., from Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues evaluated responses to a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history for 39,805 individuals without baseline heart failure in 1997. They assessed the total and direct effects of self-reported total and leisure-time physical activity on the risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of non-ischemic origin. Read More

New methods enhance the quality of myocardial perfusion imaging

New methods that enhance the quality of myocardial perfusion imaging were developed in a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. In her PhD study, Tuija Kangasmaa, Lic. Phil., invented a method which makes it possible to reduce the imaging time by up to 50%, making the scan session easier for the patient. Furthermore, the study also created two additional methods which correct errors resulting from patient movement during the scan. The methods were validated and they have already been taken into use in hospitals all over the world. Source: MedicalNewsToday Read More

New drug '20% more effective than ACE inhibitors' for treating heart failure

For treating patients with chronic heart failure, ACE inhibitors are usually the first port of call. But a new study claims an experimental drug called LCZ696 performs around 20% better than ACE inhibitors when it comes to reducing rates of hospitalizations and deaths due to chronic heart failure. Source: MedicalNewsToday Read More

Physical activity cuts risk of irregular heartbeat in older women

By now, most of us are aware of the plethora of health benefits linked to exercise. But for older women, another advantage been added to the list; researchers publishing in the Journal of the American Heart Association say increasing the amount or intensity of exercise can decrease risks of developing arrhythmia - a life-threatening irregular heartbeat. Source: MedicalNewsToday Read More

Eating fresh fruit every day 'could reduce risk of CVD by up to 40%'

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Each year, 600,000 people die from heart disease and 130,000 die from stroke. But a new study finds that the risk of developing cardiovascular disease could be reduced by up to 40%, simply by eating fresh fruit every day. Source: MedicalNewsToday Read More
First | Previous | Pages 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10 of 10 | Next | Last